Monday, March 20, 2017

Spring equinox

Happy spring equinox everyone!

Today at 10:29 UTC the we left the astronomical winter and entered the astronomical spring. Today the day and night are equally long  and from now on the days will be longer and longer up until the Summer solstice on the 21st of June.

This photo from today shows a very calm Sun with no sunspots. The sun has now been without sunspots for 14 consecutive days. Last time this happened was in April of 2010. The Suns activity has a cycle of 11 years and the Sun is heading for a new Solar Minimum expected to arrive in 2019-2020. Up until then we can expect even longer periods with no sunspots, broken from time to time by mostly small sunspots.

Photo taken with a Lunt LS80THA telescope
and a PointGrey Grasshopper 3 camera


























Follow my work in social media
http://www.facebook.com/FotografGoranStrand
http://www.instagram.com/Astrofotografen
http://twitter.com/Astrofotografen

Monday, March 13, 2017

Lifting the full moon

Yesterday it was time for another full moon to rise above the horizon. I always try to see the full moon rise, if the weather permits. I never get tired of seeing our beautiful moon slowly rise and to make things even more exciting I always try to find an exciting foreground to go along with it.

Last night I've scouted where I needed to be for the moon to rise behind this big crane. I think this mosaic photo turned out really good and it looks like the crane is lifting the moon while the residents in the building is probably watching the progress.

Nikon D500 with a Nikon AF-S 600 mm f/4.0 lens
Exposure 1/40 sec. ISO 100 at f/4.0





















Follow my work in social media
http://www.facebook.com/FotografGoranStrand
http://www.instagram.com/Astrofotografen
http://twitter.com/Astrofotografen

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Northern Lights wedding photography

About a year ago I was asked if I would like to do a wedding photography at night. The wedding was in February this year so we had plenty of time to do the photoshoot but it didn't happen until January this year. But it was worth the wait, it was so much fun and the couple was really great to work with.

Here are a couple of shots I took during that night. Both shots were taken using my Nikon D800E and a Nikon AF-S 14-24 mm f/2.8 lens.





















Follow my work in social media
http://www.facebook.com/FotografGoranStrand
http://www.instagram.com/Astrofotografen
http://twitter.com/Astrofotografen

Sunday, February 12, 2017

End of Biathlon season for me

Today I did my last day working here in Hochfilzen, Austria. It's been five amazing days with lot's of work and so much fun. Once again a big thanks to Infront Sports & Media and BMW for all the hospitality, you guys are so great to work with!

On this final day I got this solar halo over the stadium here at Biathlon Hochfilzen. Since this was my last Biathlon contest for the season I see it as a sign that it's time for me to end this and go back to shooting the sky. See you guys next season!
















Follow my work in social media
http://www.facebook.com/FotografGoranStrand
http://www.instagram.com/Astrofotografen
http://twitter.com/Astrofotografen

Saturday, February 4, 2017

New exhibition

Today my new exhibition premiered in Badhusparken in Östersund, Sweden. It's six photos, each measuring 2.4 x 2.4 meters so these are really big prints. It's always so exciting to see photos come alive in such a big format and. The exhibition runs until Sunday the 12th of February.






















Follow my work in social media
http://www.facebook.com/FotografGoranStrand
http://www.instagram.com/Astrofotografen
http://twitter.com/Astrofotografen

Friday, February 3, 2017

Best Swedish astronomy picture of the year 2016

It is with great pleasure that I can announce that my photo of the full moon rising above the mountains in Jämtland, Sweden, won first price as best Swedish astronomy picture of the year 2016. The contest is organized by the Swedish astronomy magazine Populär Astronomi.

The photo was taken on the 16th of August last year. It was taken near the small village Handöl in Jämtland. It was a calm and warm late summer evening and I had planed to take photos of the full moon rise. Just after the top of the moon was above the horizon I saw that it would touch this beautiful mountain formation an re-positioned myself to have the moon touching the mountain top in a way that it looked like it was about to roll down the hill.



















Follow my work in social media
http://www.facebook.com/fotografgoranstrand
http://www.instagram.com/Astrofotografen
http://twitter.com/Astrofotografen

Thursday, February 2, 2017

Reflected ice skating

On the 19th of December last year, I got to see the most perfect reflection of my home city Östersund I’ve ever seen. During the night, it had been raining and the water together with the flat thin ice formed a perfect gigantic mirror. When these two ice skaters passed by it felt like they were floating in the air, so unreal and beautiful.

This photo and five other of my photos will be exhibited in Badhusparken Östersund starting this Saturday. All six photos are 2.4 x 2.4 meters and the exhibition ends on the 12th of February.

Water on ice creates a perfect mirror.


Friday, January 13, 2017

Finding the lunar fog bow

A month ago I had never seen a lunar fog bow, now I have seen three. I got to see my first lunar fog bow on December 17 last year. Last night I got to see two more of these elusive phenomena. We had lots of fog around the city of Östersund and since it was the night of the full moon, I drove around chasing locations where I could see these beautiful bows.

I got two relatively good ones on photo two hours apart. I've included the time and height of the Moon when the photos was taken.

This is something I really love with this type of photography, learning about new phenomena and how and when to see them. After seeing my first lunar fog bow I new how it looked like and what conditions to look for. Last night there where perfect fog bow conditions so it was just a matter of finding the right spot. The moon light needs to be bright so the days around full moon is best. Also the light from the moon can't be to obscured by the fog and you need to have rather dense fog in the opposite direction of the moon. So try to find a location where you're standing just beneath the top of the fog, then you are inside the fog but the moon light is still bright enough to light up the bow.

Also, as you can see by these two photos, a lunar fog bow works exactly as a rainbow, the height of the bow is determined by the height of the light source (Sun/Moon), so if the moon is too high in the sky > ~35° the fog bow won't be visible. A rainbow has a radius of 42° so if the Sun's altitude in the sky is more than 42°, a rainbow can't be visible. The same goes for a fog bow, but it has a much broader radius, 30-45°. So, the lower the altitude of the Sun/moon is, the higher the bow is.

Good luck bow hunting!





















Follow my work in social media
http://www.facebook.com/fotografgoranstrand
http://www.instagram.com/Astrofotografen
http://twitter.com/Astrofotografen