Saturday, December 30, 2017

Rare colorful clouds

Yesterday, one hour before sunset, I did see some colorful clouds in the opposite direction of the Sun (At the Anti solar point). I never seen colored clouds there before so I had a hard time figuring out if they were polar stratospheric clouds or iridescent clouds. The colored clouds slowly faded away as the sun set so I thought it might be iridescent clouds, but I never seen them opposite of the Sun before.

When I returned home I contacted Les Cowley at OPOD (http://www.atoptics.co.uk) to get his opinion of these clouds and he guessed that it's tropospheric iridescent clouds. He's never seen them opposite the sun before so this is probably very rare.

Always exciting to see a new phenomena, perfect ending for 2017.

Happy new year everyone!


Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Standing on the edge to the universe

Here's a mosaic image I've made from six shots taken on the 26th of September this year. With this projection of the sky I like the depth in the image and how the Milky Way with its reflections forms a complete circle in the image. The autumn is high season for shooting the Milky Way here in the northern hemisphere, so hopefully we'll get som more clear dark night ahead for more shots of the Milky Way.

Nikon D850 with Nikon AF-S 14-24mm
NiSi Natural Night Filter


























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Thursday, August 31, 2017

The emotions and drama of a total solar eclipse

This video shows the minutes around the total solar eclipse on the 21th of August 2017. It was shot in Brasstown Valley Resort in Georgia, USA.

It was quite a drama with the clouds moving in but we got to see most of the totality and just a few minutes after the totality ended, the clouds moved in and covered the Sun.

Big thanks to Bonnier Expeditions for a superb expedition and it was great working with you guys!



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Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Getting ready for the total solar eclipse

Tomorrow I'm leaving for USA and the total solar eclipse on Monday. This will be my second total solar eclipse and the last few days I've been planing my trip and what gear to bring with me. The plan now is to have four cameras running throughout the eclipse, most of them will do the work by themselves. This is what my plan looks like at the moment:

Camera 1: Nikon D800E taking a wide field time lapse of the entire eclipse including both partial phases.

Camera 2: Nikon D500 filming in 4K with a fisheye lens from minutes before the eclipse to minutes after.

Camera 3: Nikon D810A, this camera is the one I will control manually taking closeups of the totality.

Camera 4: GoPro camera used as a behind the scenes camera filming the opposite direction of the eclipse showing us watching the eclipse.

With this plan I should be able to take a moment to just watch the totality. This is by far the most beautiful sky phenomena there is so you should not forget to just enjoy the view, it truly is a memory for life.

Total solar eclipse from Faroe Islands in 2015


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Friday, July 7, 2017

Autumn dreams

My favorite season of the year is autumn with all the beautiful colors. We're just a couple a month's away here in the northern hemisphere but for those of you who can't wait, here's a photo I took a couple of days ago where I transformed summer into autumn.

Nikon D800E with a Nikon 14-24mm f/2.8
NiSi polarizer + NiSi ND64 (6 Stop)


























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Friday, June 30, 2017

Happy Asteroid Day

Today is the international asteroid day. To celebrate that I'm posting a photo I took on the 15th of February 2013. It shows asteroid 2012DA14 as it passed just 27.700 km from Earth's surface. 2012DA14 is a small near-Earth object – approximately 45 meters in diameter and has an estimated mass of about 130,000 metric tons. This distance is well outside Earth's atmosphere, but it is inside the belt of satellites in geostationary orbit. The flyby of asteroid 2012DA14 is the closest ever predicted Earth approach for an object this large.

In this 5 minute exposure you can see the asteroid as the bright streak going diagonal to all the star trails.

Nikon D3S with a Nikon 300m f/2.8 lens
5 minute exposure @ f/4 and ISO 1600

















Path of 2012DA14. Time in UTC.


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Monday, June 26, 2017

Reflected rainbow at sunset

Rainbows are always opposite the Sun and their centres are below the horizon at the the so called antisolar point. Early morning and late afternoon it the best time to see a rainbow because the sun must not be too high. The lower the sun the higher is the rainbow.

In this photo I took in Vansbro, Sweden, taken just before sunset, the rainbow is as high as it gets and with the reflection in the water, acting as the lower half of a circle, it's easy to see that the rainbow was at its highest position. Had the Sun been any higher in the sky, this circle had been more ellipse shaped.

Rainbows are rarer than might be thought, halos are much more common.

Panorama made with a Nikon D800E with a Nikon AF-S 14-24mm f/2.8 lens


























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Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Summer solstice

Today is the summer solstice, the longest day of the year here in the northern hemisphere. Also today marks the beginning of the astronomical summer and the Sun is at its highest position in the sky throughout the year.

In this photo I show the difference between the solar height at noon during winter and summer solstice. In winter it barley gets over the treetops at 3.5° above the horizon and 6 months later, the Sun reaches an height of 50° above the horizon.

Solar height difference between winter and summer solstice





















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